Books

Jedda

Booktopia

Summary

Filmed in 1955 Jedda was the first Australian feature film to use Aboriginal actors in lead roles, the first to be filmed in colour and the first to be shown at the Cannes film festival.

It tells the tragic story of a young Aboriginal girl of the Arunte tribe, adopted by a white woman, Sarah McCann, as a surrogate for her own baby who has died. She raises her as a white child, isolating her from Aboriginal contact. But when Marbuck, an Aboriginal man seeking work arrives on the station, Jedda is fascinated by him.

Jedda was one of several popular melodramas of the post-World War II era that dealt with miscegenation. Mills explores these themes and the representation of the Australian Aborigine, while making comparisons to the Native American sub-genre of the Hollywood Western.

Mills argues that, because of its 1950s views of Aboriginal people, Jedda can be seen as a racist melodrama. The film's greatest strength lies in Chauvel's love of the Australian landscape.

Get a copy now from your favourite trusted store

Harvard citation

Korff, J 2018, Jedda, <https://www.creativespirits.info/resources/books/jedda>, retrieved 27 April 2019

Knowledge is better when your friends know too.
Who can you help today?

"In vain have you acquired knowledge if you have not imparted it to others." — Deuteronomy Rabbah

Join more than 12,863 Smart Owls who know more!