Movies

How The West Was Lost

Synopsis

On 1 May 1946, 800 Aboriginal station workers walked off sheep stations in the north-west of Western Australia, marking the beginning of a carefully organized strike that was to last for at least three years, but never officially ended.

The strike was more than a demand for better wages and conditions. It was, in the words of Keith Connolly in the Melbourne Herald, 'a well- considered statement by a grievously exploited people, standing up for their rights and dignity'.

In late 1942, a secret congress was organised by Pilbara Elders Dooley Bin Bin and Clancy McKenna, with many of the tribes in Western Australia attending - over a dozen interpreters were present to deal with 23 languages. The meeting, which lasted six weeks, was also attended by a long-time supporter of the desert people, prospector Don McLeod. The congress decided to organise a strike in the Pilbara region in order to demand better wages and conditions, and to draw attention to the treatment generally of Aboriginal people in Western Australia.

A fascinating but rarely mentioned episode in Australian history. — The Age newspaper

Details

Release dates
1987 - Australia
Rating
G - general
Notes

Dialogues are in Njangamarda, Wanmun, Injibandi and English dialogue, English subtitles

Watch now

Find "How The West Was Lost" on DVD or BluRay

Disclosure: I get commissions for purchases made through some of the below links.

Browse Aboriginal film suppliers and distributors

Explore more Aboriginal movies

Explore movie history with the Aboriginal film timeline.

Take the quiz: Are you an Aboriginal movie buff?

Harvard citation

Korff, J 2018, How The West Was Lost, <https://www.creativespirits.info/resources/movies/how-the-west-was-lost>, retrieved 7 December 2019

Knowledge is better when your friends know too.
Whom can you help today?

"Often, we are too slow to recognize how much and in what ways we can assist each other through sharing expertise and knowledge." — Owen Arthur

Join more than 14,564 Smart Owls who know more!